Frequently Asked Criminal Law Questions

Facing a criminal charge can be a frightening experience. A conviction can mean fines, restitution, community service, loss of professional license or even jail time. As a criminal defense attorney with more than 35 years of experience, I am prepared to answer your questions and provide the strong, effective protection you need. For the convenience of my prospective clients, I have listed a few of the most common concerns and a straightforward answer. Of course, every case and each client is unique, so it is wise to schedule a consultation to discuss your specific situation.

I Need To Speak With The Police To Explain The Situation, Right?

No. Emphatically, no. Defense attorneys almost invariably advise people to be polite to law enforcement, but do not answer their questions without a lawyer present. Police detectives are skilled interrogators and, in a flustered, agitated state, you might say the wrong thing — incriminating yourself and almost certainly making a bad situation worse. Even if you feel the situation has a simple explanation, wait until you have a defense lawyer there with you before answering any questions.

I Am Innocent. Do I Need To Hire A Lawyer?

No matter the severity of your charge, you should have an attorney on your side. There are filing deadlines, court appearances and intricate legal details that might derail your entire case — innocent or not. It is best to have a lawyer who can guide you through the process.

I Plan On Pleading Guilty. Do I Need To Hire An Attorney?

Much like the above, the short answer is "Yes." Even if you believe your situation to be direct and straightforward, it is wise to have a defense attorney by your side. Representing yourself in court is very rarely a good idea, as the prosecution will often seek to bring the harshest penalties possible. Even if you believe yourself to be guilty by the letter of the law, a defense attorney can shield you from the full force of the criminal justice system.

Is There A Difference Between A Felony And Misdemeanor Charge?

Misdemeanors are often considered to be less serious than felonies in the criminal justice system. For this reason, the potential punishments for felonies are often much worse than the criminal consequences of a misdemeanor conviction.

Contact Now For A Free Initial Consultation

At my firm, the Law Office of Gregory M. Alonzo, I am available 24/7 to provide aggressive criminal defense to clients in San Jose and communities throughout California.

Combining my over 35 years of experience in the court system with my extensive knowledge of criminal law and local practices allows me to do an accurate risk assessment of your case and advise you on the most likely outcome you can expect. Contact me for a confidential, no-obligation consultation.